News

Jan 25, 2018

 

Health: The Design, Planning and Politics of How and Where We Live

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Dates: 25-26 January 2018

Place: University of the West of England, Bristol

Organisers:   WORLD HEALTH ORGANISATION Collaborating Centre and the Department of Architecture, UWE, with AMPS. In collaboration with the Public Health Film Society.

Abstract Submissions:  1st June  (Round One)

Abstract Submission Form .

 

 

The World Health Organisation identifies the world’s rush to urbanization represents major threats and challenges to personal and public health. It identifies the ‘urban health threat’ as three-fold: infectious diseases, noncommunicable diseases; and violence and injury from, amongst other things, road traffic. Within this tripartite structure of health issues in the built environment are multiple individual issues affecting both the developed and the developing worlds and the global north and south.

In informal settlements the poor design and maintenance of sanitary systems is linked with TB, pneumonia and diarrhoeal disease. The industrial expansion of countries like China and India has increased urban pollution exponentially. In the UK, where this event is held, almost 2 million people live with sight loss. Obesity levels are at an all-time high. Dementia is increasing. Heart disease is linked to sedentary lifestyles and asthma has been connected with traffic congestion.

Our health and how we live in our homes, streets, neighbouroods and cities cannot be divorced. However, the health issues connected to the built environment are also a social and political problem. Demographic changes, lifestyle preferences and government funding priorities all impact the health of life in cities: an ageing population is increasingly house bound; changing neighborhood patterns erode community support systems; investment in roads increases pollution and makes cities less walkable… and more.

 

Oct 9, 2017

The 33nd Annual Pacific Rim International Conference on Disability and Diversity

Pacific Rim International Conference on disability and diversityThe 33nd Annual Pacific Rim International Conference on Disability and Diversity will be held on October 9-11, 2017 at Hilton Hawaiian Village Waikiki Beach Resort & the Modern Honolulu. The Call for Proposals is NOW OPEN, so be sure to submit your ideas early! 

For more information, please visit us at www.pacrim.hawaii.edu, or feel free to e-mail prinfo@hawaii.edu, or call 1-808-956-7539.

 

 

Apr 5, 2017

At its meeting of April 11th, the Board unanimously elected Dr. Brian Mullin. 

Brian Mullen headshotBrian is an entrepreneur, design engineer, and researcher with a passion for designing innovative medical products and assistive technologies to improve quality of life and enhance quality of care for under served populations. 

Over the last 12 years Brian's focus has been on learning how to quickly and efficiently develop commercially viable person-centered evidence based medical technologies from bench to bedside to help meet the unmet medical needs. Brian has participated all phase of going from bench to bedside and back; from conducting pilot clinical studies to explore the safety and effectiveness of treatments for people with mental illness, to the design and development of therapeutic devices, and ultimately founding a medical device company that launched a commercial product based on technology transferred from a university which resulting in equity financing and product sales. 

Brian has a B.S.M.E, M.S.M.E, and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of Massachusetts Amherst. His research lead to presentations at the American Occupational Therapy Associations (AOTA), The International Society for Autism Research (ISAR), the Nation Collegiate Innovator and Inventor's Association (NCIIA), and the BioMedical Engineering Society (BEMS), as well as peer reviewed publications and patent applications. The diverse work of his research has resulted in the ability to seamlessly translate and move between many different fields and domains.

Currently, Brian is a Manager at the Brigham Digital Innovation Hub at Brigham and Women's Hospital. He is an innovation strategy manager and leads the Open Innovation Studio where he helps innovators at the hospital advance their early stage ideas. Before his current position Brian was the founder and CEO of Therapeutic Systems, a startup with the goal of improvement mental healthcare through innovative sensory based medical technologies. 

Apr 5, 2017

Design industry leader Jason Schupbach to head ASU's Design School

Jason Schupbach, one of the founding leaders of the national creative placemaking movement and the person charged with representing all of the design disciplines at the federal level, will join Arizona State University's Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts as the new director of the Design School.

Creative placemaking is “a relatively new name for a very long practice of supporting the role of design and the arts in making great communities,” Schupbach said. It's what happens when designers and artists work with community-development groups to make arts and culture a player in community revitalization — making design and the arts as much a part of the conversation as transportation, housing, land use and public-safety strategies.

Schupbach, who will start at ASU on July 3, currently serves as the director of design and creative placemaking programs for the National Endowment for the Arts, where he oversees grantmaking and partnerships, including Our Town and Art Works grants, the Mayor’s Institute on City Design, the Citizens’ Institute on Rural Design and the NEA’s federal agency collaborations related to community development.

“We’re eager to have a leader like Jason, who can really drive design and design thinking across the university and in our communities and cities,” said Mark Searle, executive vice president and university provost at ASU.

“His creative insights, combined with his commitment to collaboration with tech and creative businesses, government and education, will advance the university’s connections with national and international partners in interdisciplinary research, community development and new models for teaching.”

Schupbach said he’s looking forward to getting to know the community, culture and environment of Arizona.

“I am enormously honored to be joining the Design School at the Herberger Institute,” Schupbach said. “ASU's reputation as a place that is on the cutting edge of experimentation with higher education makes it an amazing platform for growing the next generation of designers. I'm very excited to work with the students, faculty and the local design community to grow design's innovative ability to address issues pertinent to ASU, Arizona and the world. Together, we will build the next great American design school at the 'New American University,' a school that at its core is equitable, relevant and collaborative." 

Schupbach has spent much of his life working to improve the infrastructure and support that creative people need in order to help them succeed. Of his position at the NEA, he said that “every day I got to ask myself: How I can make life better for designers, and how can I make American design better?”

Before taking the position at the NEA, Schupbach was the creative economy director under the governor of Massachusetts, tasked with growing creative and tech businesses in the state and coordinating efforts that leverage the power of design for the good of economic development. He also served as the director of ArtistLink, a Ford Foundation-funded initiative to stabilize and revitalize communities through the creation of affordable space and innovative environments for creatives. In addition, he has worked for the mayor of Chicago and New York City’s Department of Cultural Affairs.

Schupbach holds a BS in public health from the University of North Carolina and a master's degree in city planning with an urban design certificate from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and he has written extensively on the role of design and the arts in making better communities.

“Jason has a broad interdisciplinary approach to design, as well as a long history of thinking about design and cities,” said Herberger Institute Dean Steven J. Tepper. “Last May, President Crow tasked me with recruiting a big-time design leader, someone who could take our talented faculty and students to new heights of impact and visibility. Jason is that person, and we are thrilled that he will bring his talents and connections to ASU. Moreover, as we build our national work in creative placemaking across the university, Jason’s experience as one of the founding leaders of the movement will solidify ASU’s growing reputation in design and arts-led community development.”                                     

https://asunow.asu.edu/20170411-design-industry-leader-jason-schupbach-head-design-school

Dec 23, 2016

Kyushu UniversityIndustrial and interaction designer Joao Paulo is headed to Japan to pursue a Doctoral program at Kyushu University School of Design. 

For more information on the program, visit the Kyushu School of Design course site.

Dec 20, 2016

UIA logoThe International Union of Architects (UIA) has launched the second edition of the ‘Friendly and Inclusive Spaces’ Awards. The Awards recognise and promote inclusive design – from buildings and public spaces to research – and are open to all architect members of UIA member sections. Entries can be submitted online, from 28 September until 20 December 2016, at https://uiafriendlyspaces.awardsplatform.com/.

Nov 29, 2016
Elaine Ostroff
 
Co-Foundar and former Executive Director Elaine Ostroff’s papers have just been made available at the Smithsonian archives:

Guide to the Elaine Ostroff Universal Design Papers

Biographical Note

Elaine Phillips Ostroff was born on February 27, 1933 and grew up in Fall River, Massachusetts. She graduated from Durfee High School (1951), received a B.S. from Brandeis University (1955), was awarded a Radcilffe Fellowship (1970) and an Ed.M from Harvard University (1972). In 1978, Ostroff co-founded with Cora Beth Abel the Adaptive Environments Center (now the Institute for Human Centered Design (IHCD) to confront the barriers which prevent persons with disabilities and older people from fully participating in community life. In 1989, with support from the National Endowment for the Arts, she developed the national Universal Design Education Project (UDEP) at Adaptive Environments. A national project, UDEP sought to incorporate universal design in professional curriculum. Ostroff coined the term "user/expert" in 1995 to identify individuals whose personal experiences give them unique critical capacity to evaluate environments...

 

Co-Foundar and former Executive Director  Elaine Ostroff’s papers have just been made available at the Smithsonian archives:
Guide to the Elaine Ostroff Universal Design Papers

Biographical Note

Elaine Phillips Ostroff was born on February 27, 1933 and grew up in Fall River, Massachusetts. She graduated from Durfee High School (1951), received a B.S. from Brandeis University (1955), was awarded a Radcilffe Fellowship (1970) and an Ed.M from Harvard University (1972). In 1978, Ostroff co-founded with Cora Beth Abel the Adaptive Environments Center (now the Institute for Human Centered Design (IHCD) to confront the barriers which prevent persons with disabilities and older people from fully participating in community life. In 1989, with support from the National Endowment for the Arts, she developed the national Universal Design Education Project (UDEP) at Adaptive Environments. A national project, UDEP sought to incorporate universal design in professional curriculum. Ostroff coined the term "user/expert" in 1995 to identify individuals whose personal experiences give them unique critical capacity to evaluate environments.

 

Nov 16, 2016
Gallaudet University, Malcolm Reading Consultants and Hall McKnight
 
 
Gallaudet University, and its development partner, The JBG Companies, announced November 15, 201that Hall McKnight, an award-winning architectural practice from Belfast, Ireland, has won the Gallaudet University International Design Competition.
 
This announcement is the culmination of a three-stage design competition, run by the London-based specialists Malcolm Reading Consultants, which sought to identify the most innovative design team capable of redefining the university's urban edge as a vibrant, mixed-use, creative and cultural district.The winner's vision was described as offering an accomplished approach, combining poetic qualities with a deep sense of what Gallaudet is, and should be. The competition jury praised the winners for their clear understanding of the University's unique culture and ethos, and their natural affinity for working within deaf experiences.

Hall McKnight is an award-winning architectural practice based in Belfast and London. They are particularly known for the Metropolitan Arts Centre, Belfast (completed 2012) and their remodeling of Vartov Square, Copenhagen (completed 2013). Current projects include work for King's College London, where they are developing proposals for a site located amongst some of the most significant of London's Grade 1 listed buildings. Team members include Ian McKnight, Alastair Hall, and deaf architect Richard Dougherty.  

Hall McKnight's approach proceeded from reflections on "meeting, communing, engaging" - the foundations of human communication - and proposed dynamic new spaces, both within the University and between the campus and the city. They sought to create a building that would endure and develop, acting as a "vessel" to be filled with the experiences of its occupants.  

 

Oct 31, 2016

 

October 31, 2016

INSTITUTE FOR HUMAN CENTERED DESIGN LAUNCHING TWO NEW INITIATIVES

Home to American Disabilities Act Center to Focus on Aging, Behavioral Issues

BOSTON – The Institute for Human Centered Design (IHCD), home to the New England Region Center for the American Disabilities Act, is launching two new initiatives, focusing attention on accessibility for an aging population and those with behavioral health and substance use issues.

The Institute, a Boston-based international nongovernmental educational organization committed to advancing the role of design in expanding human opportunity and experience, has recently been awarded a contract to extend for another five years its role as the American Disabilities Act Center for the region.

“We are delighted to have the opportunity to continue to serve New England to support those with rights and those with responsibilities under the ADA,” said Valerie Fletcher, Executive Director of the Institute for Human Centered Design.

 

Oct 18, 2016

Snapshot from the How LEGO Helps videoMatthew Shifrin, a valuable IHCD user/expert and creator of Lego for the Blind website was recently featured on BrainCraft's psychology/neurology YouTube channel. The YouTube video explores how LEGO can bring the world to those with visual impairments. This video comes with video description for screen readers: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1C...

View on YouTube: How LEGO Helps Blind People See

BrainCraft is created by Vanessa Hill (@nessyhill) and is brought to you by PBS Digital Studios. Talking psychology, neuroscience & why we act the way we do. 

More information on Matthew's project:

Matthew's website: http://legofortheblind.com/
Matthew's YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pfAgj...
Behind the Scenes: 10000 Digits of Pi with Matthew Shifrin: https://youtu.be/pvkUr2L-m3Q